« REPORTTS OF HIS DEATTH HAVE BEEN GREATTLY MISSPELLED | Main | DARBYQUED »

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Carrot

In Waugh's autobiography, he wrote that he said "what are you looking at ya big
c-nt?", to which Ambrose responded "don't you cuss me, man", and then Waugh rounded it off with "why don't you go and get f-cked".

To this day my blood runs cold at the idea of saying that to someone of the stature, both cricketing and physical, of Curtly Ambrose. When I was growing up and beginning to follow the game, he was the boogy-man. A big, scary, mean-spirited giant with a cricket ball. Any number of players have spoken of Waugh's almost unbelievable strength of will, but that incident alone is enough to prove it for me.

It's on YouTube by the way, although any drama of the moment is completely ruined by Allan Border's completely asinine commentary.

philsgone

Curtly was a rare foe. Everyoen remembers the Dean Jones incident. Up until that point on the tour he was a shadow of his normal self. After then, he tore us apart form memory.

Big Ramifications

What an absolute flogger. He's got the moral framework of a bikie.

Someone swears at you and you lose your mind and have to be physically restrained? Onya champ.

philsgone

Gillespie should take the England job if offerred. Just like any worker, you take the steps to get you to where you want to go. In Dizzy's case its the Australian job. A couple of years in the English system will see him hone his backstabbing and ducking and diving skills, then he can take after Boof. The South Australian coaching dynasty continues.

Tony Tea

The Gnome is in the frame for the Aussie job, and is very highly thought of after his work at the WACA. I reckon Dizzy would need to add international experience to his CV to jump ahead of GBN.

philsgone

The Gnome is a brown nose, no original ideas. You need South Australians 'cause they are a bit different. It must be harder to do a good job at Yorkshire than the WACA. Yorkshire coach would be tougher than coaching Carlton.

philsgone

two spinners in the first test. Siddle and Hazelwood are not in the frame, Good Mitch and Supergood Mitch are the options,Assume IPL form enables them not to play in the warm up.

Pat Hannagan

Completely OT and wanted to post in the World XI post but it was closed, so here it is.

Was reading Blaxland's journal from 1823 about crossing the Blue Mountains and had a compilation, endless, of YT song series of the best of Van Morrison on when this came on: Them's cover of "It's all over now (baby blue)"

Struck by the opening melody I immediately looked up Beck and can confirm this: Jack-Ass

I do have Bringing it All Back Home and wanted to see if Beck was covering Van Morrison who was covering Dylan (who isn't Dylan, but you know that.) The original: It's All over now Baby Blue.

I see the correlation between Beck and Them, but Them's cover makes a whole new song out of the original, which is horrible (the original, that is, but someone saw something in it).

I think the three songs are remarkable.

Like the Mountains crossing was in three stages (historically). 1) Blaxland and the rest 2) Evans and 3) Cox and his gang who built the road.

Which reminds me. 05/06/2015 is the bicentenary of my family being freemen in Oz. All on account of our first Paddy working on that Cox Road. Here's to him.

Tony Tea

Graham Bonnet.

Pat Hannagan

Excellent, Tones. A great version, never heard it before. Amazing how some people see something in nothing and make it new.

Professor Rosseforp

"Amazing how some people see something in nothing and make it new" -- All along the watchtower (Dylan) -- reimagined* by Hendrix.
No more needs to be said.
*except that "reimagined" should always start alarm bells if someone is trying to sell you something, e.g. the University of Sydney "reimagined" its MBA some years back, so I wrote to them (as an occasional humbug) and asked them if there was something wrong with the old MBA (apart from the obvious problem that no MBA need exist at all).
There was an inane and irrelevant reply that suggested I might not have been the only one to question their "reimagining".

Tony Tea

When someone asks me a curly question I re-imagine it as a Dorothy Dixer.

philsgone

I believe Graham Bonnet spent time fronting Deep Purple in a one phase of their existence.

Tony Tea

Was that the How Long Can We Drag This Out For Until Everyone Realises We Are Slop phase?

philsgone

oops it was Ritchie Blackmores Rainbow.

Big Ramifications

Never understood the Deep Purple love. Even Smoke On The Water is tosh. I do like the history of how the song came about.

Can anyone point me to a decent song of theirs? I'm very open minded. Lyrics. Vocal range. Interesting guitar / drumming work. ANY redeeming features of any song?

ps: Tony Tea, whenever I click a link on your site "x.vindicosuite.com" ever so briefly flashes on screen before it disappears. It got me a bit worried, but it seems like it might be harmless[?]. A few people have spotted the same thing, I found this forum response via Google.

x.vindcosuite.com seems to be "passive DNS replicator", which may be performing a genuine function; but apparently buggy software at sitemeter results in pages with sitemeter counting code on them getting redirected there.

I've been seeing intermittent flashes of this sort of thing from sitemeter for over a year, and during that same period of time, the company has failed to respond to repeated questions directed at their "support" team.

As of yesterday evening, the problem was categorical rather than intermittent, so I removed the sitemeter code from the WordPress theme, and the problem went away.

As far as I can tell, this is a symptom of incompetence rather than malice, but in any case, sitemeter is clearly more trouble than it's worth.

Tony Tea

I yanked the Sitemeter code. I'd forgotten I even had it.

philsgone

Mr Big - Deep Purple Made in Japamn. Side 1 - Highway Star, Child in Time. One of the great side ones ever recorded certainly for live albums. Lyrics are banal, but the execution is brilliant. 43 years old this year and still holding id own.

Tony Tea

I loved the Made In Japan version of Space Truckin' with the extended lead-in, but that was when I was about 13. I checked it out a couple of years ago and it's fair to say Deep Purple does not hold up well.

Big Ramifications

Thanks.

philsgone

Perhaps like all of us...
Steve Smith to become the next legend no.3 for Australia. I plant my stake in the ground 3/6/15

Pat Hannagan

I tried to listen to Graham Bonnet's "It's all over now (baby blue) again and felt ill. Looking about me for poisoned food like that that illed the All Blacks when the investigations into FIFA were not begun and Clint Eastwood made a movie testimony to Saint Mandela, reaching for my heart and urging the children to not call triple zero just yet, even though the Panthers were slaughtered, and the Mighty Blue and Gold had failed but once again, I reached for the YT once again, and came up with this: Poor Me, Woe is Me, I go For Maaaal-Bourne...the Demoons! The Deeeeeemons.

(We will rise)

Cameron

OT: TT, in case you missed it: https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CHDS0srUkAEpxY2.jpg:large

Tony Tea

Yes, I saw that yesterday. The No Sub-editors Era is really starting to bite.

Professor Rosseforp

"The No Sub-editors Era is really starting to bite" -- even the Sydney Morning Herald website is littered with errors, including misplaced apostrophes, and recently a picture of the Partridge Family that came from the more recent movie, rather than the TV show to which the article referred.

Professor Rosseforp

When I hear Deep Purple, I always hear a ripoff of Vanilla Fudge. But Richie Blackmore's guitar work is very good, and differs from his contemporaries because he generally used his fingers rather than a plectrum ; he also avoided the cliches of blues scales, and use other scales to create a wider vocabulary than somebody like Eric Clapton.
I do love one of the documentaries where they explained how they used distortion pedals and amps so that the organ sounded like a guitar -- I thought "Why not just use a guitar?".
Wailing vocals on "Child in time" are not quite Roger Daltrey, but are pretty good.

Professor Rosseforp

Good example from today's Herald: "Nike won an eight-year deal to make uniforms for the NBA, taking over for Adidas when its contract runs out in 2017" -- I think they mean "taking over from", and there's something wrong with the sequence of tenses, shifting from the past to the present (when the present is indicating a future event).

Tony Tea

Prof, surely you don't expect a mere sub-editor, who probably never studied grammar past a noun is a naming word and a verb is a doing word and an adjective is a describing word, to understand sequence of tenses?

Professor Rosseforp

Tony, I don't expect it.
I've studied a fair bit of grammar myself, and can't remember this ever being mentioned. However it has come up in foreign languages I have studied and since mostly forgotten, but often revolves around the subjunctive used to express possible actions.
A relative of mine is a very erudite legal man, and he is very conscious of it in English -- in fact has been known to yell expletives at the television if the correct sequence is not used.

Tony Tea

I went to school from 1966 to 1979. I don't ever remember having more than a rudimentary introduction to grammar. Most people older than me say that grammar went out somewhere around 1970. As you mention, though, grammar is a huge part of foreign languages. Those foreign lingos in turn turn you into a grammar Nazi, since when you learn in, say, Latin you become acutely aware of terms such as sequence of tense, subordinate clauses, subjunctives, volitive, hortatory, optatative, jussive, pluperfect, perfect, imperfect, present, historical present, future, infinitive, participles... which is gold if you want to reveal where one was schooled.

Professor Rosseforp

I was at school earlier than you, Tony, and grammar was taught at a basic level to everybody. Most people got by, a fair few had no idea, and probably 10% understood and enjoyed it.
It's like spelling: some people can spell, some can't. Probably the emphasis on spelling and dictation meant that more people had a better idea of spelling and punctuation than youngsters today, but for a lot of people it was like calculus -- a pointless academic exercise that a few brainiacs got excited about.
I've seen kids caned because they couldn't spell or multiply, but they weren't able to improve much, even with the threat of a beating. I was lucky enough to do both reasonably well, but I recognised early that it was a fluke of brain structure -- just like my inability to hit a moving ball.

The comments to this entry are closed.