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By the way, this isn't a things were better in my day grizzle; I reckon the 2005 Kiwi remake goes alright.

And as Nora said to Boynton (who found the ad) yesterday "Don't you just love the bit at the end with the bouncing animals."

Yes those bouncing animals really hit the right note- "let us be merry for tomorrow we'll be dinner"

It's funny. I hadn't seen that ad for the best part of 30 years, hadn't even thought of it, and yet after only one listen, it came back clear as any famous song of the era.

Just watched the re-make. Nuh.
Seatbelts, acronyms and thin fast-food kids.
And in 1973, you might have seen a single Colonel in the landscape, but KFC is only found in the Maccapizza strip these days.

Kentucky Fried is better poetically than KFC.

Disagreement?

< dudgeon >Harrumpf!< / dudgeon >

For the record: The first was definitely better. But while the new one with its seatbelts, thin fast-food kids and acronyms is NQR, nor is it dreadful. Not IMHO, anyway.

Chook facts:

1) Sanders was made a colonel by Kentucky governor Ruby Laffoon.
2) The name Ruby Laffoon renders all other chook facts redundant.

NB: Kentucky Colonel Harland Sanders not to be confused with Kentucky Colonel Clarence White and Band.

Hoh, I was expecting an essay on the state of contemporary music.

I prefer the original. No need for the gimmicky riff. And why does a faster tempo mean updated? Oh dear, I've thought about this too much already. Stop now.

It is always interesting to watch people eat food in tv ads. They have obviously done the take twenty times and they make it look very forced. (especially Kiwis Find Chickens)

I heartily endorse anything that uses the word "boombah"

Another difference between the two is that in the original and best Hugo puts the box between his legs so it won't topple, while in the remake and not best Holly puts the bucket on the seat as the car goes bouncing up the road.

How do all the various pizza franchises know to reduce the size of their pizzas at the same time? The "large" pizzas now would be struggling to be "medium" in the good old days, when pizza was a radical taste that you could have, in the words of the song, "while you're havin' a beer".

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